Healthy Food Database

Squid
Squid are soft-bodied cephalopod molluscs related to the octopus. Like the octopus they have heads and eyes but also a mantle that contains an ink sac. When the squid senses danger it squirts ink out of its mantle to obscure itself from sight of the enemy. The most common squid available in Australia is the Arrow squid. Arrow squid can grow to 40cm.

Note about amines: Fresh seafood has low amine levels, but when older than two days the amine content rises to moderate, and any fish that has been frozen has high levels.
Category: Seafood - Mollusc
In Season: Summer Autumn
To Buy:
Sold fresh or frozen, whole, in tubes or ring form.Fresh tubes or rings should be white and without any brown markings with a pleasant sea smell.
To Store:
Wrap in plastic wrap or store in an airtight container.Keeps up to 3 days in the refrigerator or you can freeze it for up to 3 months.
Tips & Tricks:
Some cooks recommend marinating briefly in kiwi fruit to tenderise the squid - acidic marinades with lemon or vinegar cook it and make it tough.
Cooking Tips:
Cook very quickly over a high heat or slowly in a casserole. Cut into flat pieces and score on the inside, coat in sea salt and cracked black pepper. Sear very quickly over high heat on a barbecue or chargrill.

Nutrition per 1 Cup:

Weight (grams):
185
Carbohydrates, g:
0.0
Fat (g):
3.2
Monosaturated Fat , g:
0.3
Niacin (B3):
Folic Acid:
Potassium:
Phosphorus:
Amines:
Low
Glutamates:
n/a
Energy (kJ):
883
Protein (g):
44.9
Saturated Fat, g :
1.1
Vitamin B1:
Iron, mg:
Zinc:
Magnesium:
Sodium:
Salicylates:
Safe/negligible amount

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Anaemia
Low Energy
Prostate Problems
Find recipes with Squid

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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