Healthy Food Database

Scallops
The most common scallop in Australia is the Tasmanian Scallop. It has a ridged fan-shaped shell. They are caught wild but many today are harvested. Scallops reach about 11cm. The meat is white and is surrounded by an orange roe (coral).
Scallops have a delicate, sweet flavour with a medium to firm texture.

Note about amines: Fresh seafood has low amine levels, but when older than two days the amine content rises to moderate, and any fish that has been frozen has high levels.
Category: Seafood - Crustacean
In Season: all year
To Buy:
Scallops are nicest bought fresh in their shell. Avoid any with brown markings. The meat should be white/cream. Use your nose to check for a fresh sea smell.
To Store:
Place in an airtight container or place scallops in their shells on a tray covered with plastic.Store in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.
Tips & Tricks:
Wash thoroughly, remove brown vein; leave the roe (coral) on. 1 kg will give you 40-50 scallops. Note: One serve of scallops is equal to about 7 scallops.
Cooking Tips:
Scallops can be grilled, barbecued, steamed, stir-fried or poached. Overcooking will make them tough. Try steaming with a soy sauce, coriander and ginger dressing.

Nutrition per Per serve:

Weight (grams):
85
Carbohydrates, g:
0.5
Fat (g):
0.6
Monosaturated Fat , g:
0.0
Zinc:
Sodium:
Salicylates:
Safe/negligible amount
Energy (kJ):
198
Protein (g):
9.9
Saturated Fat, g :
0.2
Vitamin B1:
Phosphorus:
Amines:
Low
Glutamates:
n/a

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Prostate Problems
Find recipes with Scallops

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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