Healthy Food Database

Lobster
Australian lobsters are distinguished from Northern hemisphere lobsters by a lack of any noticeable claws. Although lobsters can grow up to 1m long and weigh up to 8kg, the most common and sought after size is 800g. All lobsters are premium-priced crustaceans, with the cold water varieties most highly regarded for flavour and texture.
Category: Seafood - Crustacean
In Season: all year
To Buy:
Lobsters are sold live, cooked or frozen green (often as lobster tails). Avoid buying green/uncooked product as they deteriorate rapidly after death. Whole lobsters yield 35% - 42% of their weight as flesh.
To Store:
Live lobsters should be cooked as soon as possible after purchase. Keep moist, cool and dark. Cooked lobsters can be refrigerated for 2-3 days or frozen for up to 3 months.
Tips & Tricks:
Live lobsters must be killed prior to cooking. This can be done by freezing for 1 hour or immersing in ice slurry which is 50% ice and 50% water, this slows down the metabolism causing them to sleep.
Cooking Tips:
Lobster is also suited to steaming, poaching, shallow frying, baking, grilling and barbecuing, avoid overcooking. The shell will turn bright orange and the flesh opaque once it is cooked. Do not re-cook cooked lobster.

Nutrition per 1 Cup:

Weight (grams):
153
Carbohydrates, g:
0.0
Fat (g):
1.4
Monosaturated Fat , g:
0.3
Zinc:
Magnesium:
Sodium:
Salicylates:
Safe/negligible amount
Energy (kJ):
623
Protein (g):
33.7
Saturated Fat, g :
0.3
Niacin (B3):
Potassium:
Phosphorus:
Amines:
Moderate
Glutamates:
n/a

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Acne
Skin Conditions
Immune Deficiencies
Prostate Problems
Find recipes with Lobster

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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