The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Radicchio

Radicchio is a lettuce related to chicory that looks very similar to a red cabbage. The leaves are much softer than a cabbage but more robust than most other lettuce leaves. It has a mildly bitter flavour which mellows when cooked. radicchio can be grilled, roasted or slow cooked. It's delicious grilled in a warm salad with chicken, walnuts and green apple. The colour indicates the presence of anthocyanins, powerful antioxidants which help protect cells in the body. It's also a good source of vitamin C, A potassium and calcium.
Category: Vegetable
In Season: all year
To Buy: Buy fresh, crisp-looking leaves that are not soft and wilted or showing signs of deterioration.
To Store: Store in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator.
Tips & Tricks: Wash and dry leaves thoroughly using a salad spinner.

Nutrition (1 Cup):

Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Negligible
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Moderate

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Brush half a head of radicchio with extra virgin olive oil and place under the grill until it softens and slightly browns.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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