The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Beans - Broad

Broad Beans, also known as faba or fava beans, have thick, large pods. The beans are big and flat and kidney-shaped, with a tough skin.resh broad beans should be selected for their small pods ( the beans will be sweeter and more tender). They are best bought early spring, although late season beans can be turned into dips and purees. Select moist green and crisp pods. If they collapse when held upright they are no good.
Fresh broad beans can be stored in vegetable bags in the crisper section of the fridge for 2 - 3 days.
Fresh beans should be shelled and boiled in fresh water for 3 - 5 minutes (without salt as salt makes the skin tougher). Remove the skin from the bean if it is still tough as it can be bitter and unpleasant tasting.
Soak dried broad beans for 2 days, changing the water regularly before cooking. Pop the bean from the skin and cook in fresh water for up to 2 hours until tender. Do not serve fresh broad beans raw as some people have been known to be allergic to them.
Category: Legume
In Season:
To Buy: Can be bought fresh or dried. Dried beans can be green, brown or beige. Buy dried beans from a store with a high turnover of produce to ensure the beans are not too old. Fresh broad beans should be selected for their small pods ( the beans will be sweeter and more tender). They are best bought early spring, although late season beans can be turned into dips and purees. Select moist green and crisp pods. If they collapse when held upright they are no good.
To Store: Store in a cool dry place in airtight containers. Can be stored in the freezer in humid conditions. Fresh broad beans can be stored in vegetable bags in the crisper section of the fridge for 2 - 3 days.
Tips & Tricks: Cheat when you have to with a packet of beans tucked away in the freezer for emergencies.

Nutrition (0.5 Cup):

Weight (grams): 85
Carbohydrates, g: 5.5
Fibre, g:
Fat (g): 0.4
Monosaturated Fat , g: 0.1
Vitamin B2: Aids in the metabolism of fats, protein and carbohydrate. Also involved in maintaining mucous membranes and body tissues, good vision and health of skin.
Iron, mg: Main function is synthesis of red blood cells, thus delivering oxygen around the body and maintaining all bodily functions.

Contraindications:
Excess accumulation may play a role in development of heart disease.
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Very High
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a
Energy (kJ): 236
High GI > 70 : Glycaemic Index refers to the rate at which carbohydrate rich foods are converted to glucose for energy by the body; High GI foods raise blood sugar levels quickly and creating energy spikes followed quickly by energy slumps.
Protein (g): 5.9
Saturated Fat, g : 0.1
Vitamin B1: Important for energy production and carbohydrate metabolism. Enhances mental capabilities and promotes a general sense of health and wellbeing.
Vitamin C: Antioxidant, anti inflammatory and immune-boosting, this vitamin has a range of uses. Is essential for collagen formation, therefore plays a role in wound healing. Fights infection and protects against free radical damage. Vitamin C helps maintain normal cholesterol levels, promotes the absorption of iron and counters the effects of stress as it is concentrated in the adrenal glands.

Contraindications:
Large doses can cause diaorrhea or gas.
Folic Acid: Important during pregnancy as this vitamin is involved in the duplication of chromosomes, preventing birth defects. Lowers the risk of heart disease and is necessary for proper brain and gut function.
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. High

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Fresh beans should be shelled and boiled in fresh water for 3 - 5 minutes (without salt as salt makes the skin tougher). Remove the skin from the bean if it is still tough as it can be bitter and unpleasant tasting. Soak dried broad beans for 2 days, changing the water regularly before cooking. Pop the bean from the skin and cook in fresh water for up to 2 hours until tender. Do not serve fresh broad beans raw as some people have been known to be allergic to them.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Anaemia
Cold and Flus

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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