The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Corn Oil

As the name suggests, corn oil is made from corn and is a rich yellow colour. It has a high smoke point and can be used to fry foods. Corn oil is extracted from the germ of the corn located at the sharp end of the corn kernel. Corn oil has a higher amount of polyunsaturated fat than olive oil and consequently is not as effective in lowering cholesterol levels.
Category: Oils and Fats
In Season: all year
To Buy: Buy a good quality corn oil - available from health food stores. Like all oils, if using in small amounts buy little bottles.
To Store: Best stored in dark, glass bottles in a cool pantry away from direct sunlight.
Tips & Tricks: Because it has an extremely mild, sweet flavour, corn oil can be used instead of butter for baking.

Nutrition (1 Tablespoon):

Energy (kJ): 681
Protein (g): 0.0
Saturated Fat, g : 2.4
Vitamin E: A powerful antioxidant and immune system stimulator, this vitamin is composed of a group of compounds called tocopherols. Protects the body from free radicals, improves oxygen and blood supply to the muscles and heart for better stamina, reducing blood pressure and imroving circulation. Prevents the oxidation of harmful LDL cholesterol and inhibits scar tissue formation in arteries and skin, and counters the effects of ageing.

Contraindications:
Taken in excess may cause toxicity. Not advised for patients taking Vitamin K or anti-coagulant medicine as it may counter or exacerbate effects.
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. High
Carbohydrates, g: 0.0
Fat (g): 18.4
Monosaturated Fat , g: 5.5
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. High
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: When substituting oil for butter use less oil than the recipe calls for butter. Use 1.5 Cups wholewheat flour to 0.25 cups corn oil and a small quantity of water to mix to a pastry dough.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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