The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Eggs

Not that they need much describing - brown or white, available in a range of sizes. They can be bought as freerange, fresh eggs, fortified with Omega 3. They are nutritional powerhouses and well worth their own special compartment in the fridge.
Don't compromise here - free-range is always the best. Not only will the layer have enjoyed a good life but the taste is incomparable.
he eggshell contains thousands of tiny pores which can absorb odours. Keep them fresh for weeks by storing them in the carton or the egg section of the fridge.
Egg whites can be frozen. Egg yolks unbroken will keep covered in the fridge for up to 3 days and the whites for 1 week.
To test to see if your eggs are fresh, place it in a bowl of water. If it floats, blunt side up, it's old. Older eggs, while not so good to boil and poach are usually perfectly OK to use in baking.
Category: Poultry
In Season: all year
To Buy: Don't compromise here - freerange is always the best. Not only will the layer have enjoyed a good life but the taste is incomparable.
To Store: The eggshell contains thousands of tiny pores which can absorb odours. Keep them fresh for weeks by storing them in the carton or the egg section of the fridge. Egg whites can be frozen. Egg yolks unbroken will keep covered in the fridge for up to 3 days and the whites for 1 week.
Tips & Tricks: Test to see if your eggs are fresh by placing it in a bowl of water. If it floats, blunt side up, it's stale.

Nutrition (1 Unit):

Weight (grams): 50
Carbohydrates, g: 0.2
Fat (g): 5.1
Monosaturated Fat , g: 2.2
Vitamin B2: Aids in the metabolism of fats, protein and carbohydrate. Also involved in maintaining mucous membranes and body tissues, good vision and health of skin.
Vitamin B12: Maintains the health and function of the nervous system, and is involved in the growth and division of all cells, including red blood cells. Also plays a role in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fat and protein.
Folic Acid: Important during pregnancy as this vitamin is involved in the duplication of chromosomes, preventing birth defects. Lowers the risk of heart disease and is necessary for proper brain and gut function.
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Safe/negligible amount
Energy (kJ): 297
Protein (g): 6.4
Saturated Fat, g : 1.2
Vitamin A: Often called the "anti-infective" vitamin, it protects the mucous membranes of the body, reducing chance of infection and enhancing the immune system's response. Necessary for growth and maintenenance of bones, teeth and body tissues and healthy foetal development, this vitamin is also important for night vision.

Contraindications:
Taken in excess will accumulate in the body.
Niacin (B3):
Vitamin D: Produced in the body by the action of UV light on the skin. Necessary for the absorption of calcium and the regulation of phosphorus; this action maintains bone and teeth health as well as nervous system, heart and muscles and blood clotting functions.

Contraindications:
Taken in excess will accumulate in the body and cause toxicity.
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Low
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Poached eggs are much healthier than fried - and made well they're delicious. Bring a deep frying pan filled with water to the boil. Add a 1/2 tsp vinegar to the water. with a spoon, stir the water and drop the egg into the water when it is moving around in a whirlpool. Cool for 3 - 4 minutes before removing with a slotted spoon, gently blotting off any excess water and serving immediately.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Blood Clots
Eye Problems
Stress
Depression
Malnutrition

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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