The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Apples

Did you know the way to test the goodness of an apple is to flick it with your fingernail? If it makes a sound similar to flicking a drum the apple will be hard and juicy. Just the way an apple should be. There is much truth to the phrase, an apple a day keeps the doctor away. Perhaps surprising news to some will be that an apple - with its skin kept on - contains more antioxidants than ˝ a cup of blueberries. It's yet another example of nature looking after us; in Autumn when the price of blueberries goes up, the price of apples goes down. Scientific reviews have shown that apples are protective against cancer - particularly cancers of the colon, lung, and breast -reduce the risk of heart disease, asthma and type 2 diabetes. The high antioxidant capacity of apples is believed to be one of the reasons for their impressive disease fighting potential.
There are many different types of apples including Bonza, Braeburn, Royal Gala, Granny Smith, Golden Delicious, Red Delicious, Jazz, Red Fuji, Sundowner, Pink Lady, Jonathon, Jonagold, Kanzi and Greenstar to name but some. New season apples start late summer and last right through to winter.
Category: Fruit
In Season: all year
To Buy: Look for apples with a firm smooth surface and avoid any that are slightly bruised or have insect damage.
To Store: Apples will stay crisp stored in the fridge
Tips & Tricks: Take the crisp test by tapping the suface lightly with your nail - a dull sound indicates that there are crunchier apples elsewhere

Nutrition (1 Unit):

Energy (kJ): 319
Low GI < 55: Glycaemic Index refers to the rate at which carbohydrate rich foods are converted to glucose for energy by the body; Low GI carbohydrtes release glucose is released slowly into the bloodstream and help to regulate energy levels and insulin production.
Protein (g): 0.4
Saturated Fat, g : 0
Vitamin B2: Aids in the metabolism of fats, protein and carbohydrate. Also involved in maintaining mucous membranes and body tissues, good vision and health of skin.
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. No information available
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a
Carbohydrates, g: 17.5
Fibre, g:
Fat (g): 0.1
Vitamin B1: Important for energy production and carbohydrate metabolism. Enhances mental capabilities and promotes a general sense of health and wellbeing.
Niacin (B3):
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. No information available

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Golden delicious apples are one of the best apples to cook with. Delicious baked in foil or stewed with ginger. Used in the classic waldorf salad with celery and walnuts.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Cold and Flus
Diabetes
Detoxifying
Constipation
Diarrhoea

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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