The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Chilli Pepper - Fresh

There are hundreds of different species of chillies grown all over the world. Chillies are enormously popular, particularly in the States. Some suggest they may be addictive, releasing endorphins when eaten and providing a feeling of relief and pleasure. Double pleasure could then be derived from chilli and chocolate - a drink made famous in the book "Chocolat".
Some are fiery hot and others less so. The small red ones are typically the hottest while the large ones are generally quite sweet.
Chillies are high in fibre and vitamin C although you don't (or can't) eat that much of them to benefit but even in small amounts they are a good source of antioxidants and beta-carotene. Because they heat the body internally they are known to raise the metabolic rate and assist in weight loss. Whether that's true or not remains to be scientifically proven. What is true however is that in large qualities chillies appear to have antibacterial qualities which is particularly handy in the third world countries which are hot and have poor refrigeration.
Chillies can be store in the refrigerator and if bought in large quantities, frozen or dried out.
Category: Spice
In Season: all year
To Buy: Buy fresh, smooth-skinned chillis.
To Store: Chillies can be hung up to dry or frozen if you buy too many. They will keep fresh in the crisper for about 10 days.
Tips & Tricks: Wear gloves when handling chillies as they can sting - and avoid putting your hands anywhere near your eyes after handling them.

Nutrition (1 Unit):

Energy (kJ): 12.1
Protein (g): 0.2
Saturated Fat, g : 0.0
Vitamin C: Antioxidant, anti inflammatory and immune-boosting, this vitamin has a range of uses. Is essential for collagen formation, therefore plays a role in wound healing. Fights infection and protects against free radical damage. Vitamin C helps maintain normal cholesterol levels, promotes the absorption of iron and counters the effects of stress as it is concentrated in the adrenal glands.

Contraindications:
Large doses can cause diaorrhea or gas.
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. High
Carbohydrates, g: 0.3
Fat (g): 0.0
Monosaturated Fat , g: 0.0
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Low
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Always deseed chillies. If you are unsure in a recipe whether you should use hot or sweet, check by the instructions and quantity required. Small amounts finely chopped indicate hot.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Aches & Pains
Cold and Flus
Immune Deficiencies
Low Libido
Circulatory Disorders
High Blood Cholesterol
Intestinal Worms & Parasites
Ulcers

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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