The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Parsley

The superhero of foods. The Greeks held parsley in high esteem. It was reputed to have sprung from the blood of a Greek hero, Archemorus, the forerunner of death, and Homer relates that chariot horses were fed by warriors with the leaves.
Parsley has been cultivated in the Mediterranean since ancient times. There are two types of parsley; continental (flat leaf), or curly. Curly parsley is the most common with the strongest flavour.
Category: Herb
In Season: all year
To Buy: Parsley is easy to grow yourself but if you have to buy it look for young leaves that are supple and not papery and dried out. Continental parsley is best for salads and Middle Eastern cooking.
To Store: Store in plastic bags wrapped in damp kitchen paper. Parsley will keep for a 3-4 days this way. Or stand in a jug of water and pull a clean plastic bag down over the bunch, folding under the base of the jug, to create a hot-house effect to retain moisture and freshness.
Tips & Tricks: Always wash parsley before chopping, not after, or you'll lose all the flavour and nutrients. Parsley is THE universal seasoning and can be added to just about anything savoury.

Nutrition (0.5 Cup):

Weight (grams): 32
Carbohydrates, g: 0.1
Fat (g): 0.1
Monosaturated Fat , g: 0.0
Vitamin C: Antioxidant, anti inflammatory and immune-boosting, this vitamin has a range of uses. Is essential for collagen formation, therefore plays a role in wound healing. Fights infection and protects against free radical damage. Vitamin C helps maintain normal cholesterol levels, promotes the absorption of iron and counters the effects of stress as it is concentrated in the adrenal glands.

Contraindications:
Large doses can cause diaorrhea or gas.
Folic Acid: Important during pregnancy as this vitamin is involved in the duplication of chromosomes, preventing birth defects. Lowers the risk of heart disease and is necessary for proper brain and gut function.
Antioxidants:
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Very low
Energy (kJ): 28
Protein (g): 0.6
Saturated Fat, g : 0.0
Vitamin A: Often called the "anti-infective" vitamin, it protects the mucous membranes of the body, reducing chance of infection and enhancing the immune system's response. Necessary for growth and maintenenance of bones, teeth and body tissues and healthy foetal development, this vitamin is also important for night vision.

Contraindications:
Taken in excess will accumulate in the body.
Iron, mg: Main function is synthesis of red blood cells, thus delivering oxygen around the body and maintaining all bodily functions.

Contraindications:
Excess accumulation may play a role in development of heart disease.
Potassium: Needed for normal growth and muscle and nerve contraction. Together with sodium regulates water and fluid balance in the body.
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. No information available
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Make fatoush or tabouleh. Mix with other salad greens for a fresh, nutritious salad. Add to couscous, soups and stews. Use the stalks to make vegetable stock. Add to stuffed mushrooms.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Anaemia
Eye Problems
Premature Aging
Cold and Flus
Fluid Retention
Detoxifying

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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