The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Macadamia Nut

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Macadamias are true nuts as each nut is encased in a hard outer shell. First found in Queensland in the mid 1800s, they were shipped to Hawaii. The Americans call them the Hawaiian nut. The macadamia is a large, creamy white, oily nut. Production in Australia is the largest in the world.
Category: Nut
In Season: all year
To Buy: Because they are so hard to shell, macadamia nuts are often bought pre-shelled. Buy from a store where you can guarantee high turnover of product as shelled nuts deteriorate more quickly than unshelled. Similarly, roasted nuts deteriorate quite quickly. Buy raw nuts that are well-shaped and uniformly light in colour. Those available in vacuum-packed jars or cans will stay fresher longer.
To Store: Shelled nuts will keep well in the refrigerator in a tightly sealed container for up to two months. Unshelled macadamias will keep for up to one year at room temperature.
Tips & Tricks: Unshelled macadamias can be opened with a special nutcracker designed for macadamia nuts. One serve of macadamias is equal to about 10 nuts.

Nutrition (Per serve):

Weight (grams): 20
Carbohydrates, g: 0.9
Fat (g): 15.2
Monosaturated Fat , g: 12.3
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. High
Energy (kJ): 614
Protein (g): 1.5
Saturated Fat, g : 2.1
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. High
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Roast your own macadamias in the oven by laying them on a baking sheet, sprinkle with fine ground sea salt and roast at 180C, turning regularly until they brown slightly.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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