The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Asparagus

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Fresh asparagus is a true prince of vegetables - canned, on the other hand, is quite awful.
Green or white with straight stalks approx 20cm long tipped with a spearheaded point of tiny folded-in leaves.

Note: Tinned asparagus has a salicylate content higher than fresh, classified as moderate.
Category: Vegetable
In Season: Spring
To Buy: Fresh only, and in season - check the cut end and avoid any that look dried out and woody. Try to buy on the day, or the day before, you plan to eat it.
To Store: In the crisper in a plastic storage bag for 2 days. Remove any ties around the bunch before storing.
Tips & Tricks: Snap the bottom end off the asparagus with your hands -holding the middle of the stalk in one hand and the bottom with the other. The stalk will break at the top of the tough woody part. 1 serve is approximately 4-6 spears of asparagus. Asparagine is an active ingredient in asparagus that has an irritant effect, so should be avoided by those with inflammatory conditions, such as gout, rheumatism and cystitis.

Nutrition (Per serve):

Weight (grams): 71
Carbohydrates, g: 1.0
Fat (g): 0.2
Vitamin B1: Important for energy production and carbohydrate metabolism. Enhances mental capabilities and promotes a general sense of health and wellbeing.
Folic Acid: Important during pregnancy as this vitamin is involved in the duplication of chromosomes, preventing birth defects. Lowers the risk of heart disease and is necessary for proper brain and gut function.
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Negligible
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a
Energy (kJ): 58.9
Protein (g): 1.8
Saturated Fat, g : 0.0
Vitamin C: Antioxidant, anti inflammatory and immune-boosting, this vitamin has a range of uses. Is essential for collagen formation, therefore plays a role in wound healing. Fights infection and protects against free radical damage. Vitamin C helps maintain normal cholesterol levels, promotes the absorption of iron and counters the effects of stress as it is concentrated in the adrenal glands.

Contraindications:
Large doses can cause diaorrhea or gas.
Potassium: Needed for normal growth and muscle and nerve contraction. Together with sodium regulates water and fluid balance in the body.
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Moderate

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Wash thoroughly. Peel white asparagus - green does not require peeling. Boil in slightly salted water in large pan for 4 minutes or steam in a large bamboo steamer for the same length of time. Serve as it with a sprinkle of olive oil. Lemon served on cooked asparagus will cause discolouration.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Cold and Flus
Fluid Retention

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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