The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Incaberries

Incaberries are organically grown in rich volcanic soils of the high altitude regions of South America. They have been eaten by the locals as a fold medicine for centuries. The dried berry has a unique flavour that starts with a sweet palate and finishes with a fine and delicate sour note. They have a higher antioxidant capacity than many other fruits, with most of the antioxidants found in the seeds and the highest amount of fibre than all common dried fruits. They also contain a surprising amount of protein for a fruit, good levels of potassium and phosphorus, low sodium and no preservatives. Released to the Australian market in June 2011 they are currently available dried or chocolate coated.
Category: Fruit
In Season: all year
To Buy: Look for incaberries in selected health foods, greengrocers, and specialty shops. For details on main distributors visit www.incaberry.com.au
To Store: Like all dried fruits store in an airtight container in a dry cool pantry
Tips & Tricks: The flavour of incaberries combines beautifully with walnuts, dark chocolate, cheese

Nutrition (100 Grams):

Energy (kJ): 1220
Fibre, g:
Fat (g): 3.4
Phosphorus: Closely related to calcium, this mineral is an important component of bones and teeth and helps maintain the body's energy supply and pH levels.
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. No information available
Carbohydrates, g: 49
Protein (g): 6.4
Potassium: Needed for normal growth and muscle and nerve contraction. Together with sodium regulates water and fluid balance in the body.
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. No information available
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Use in muesli, granola, in sweet slices,stuffing for turkey and poultry, in Moroccan flavoured casseroles and Indian flavoured curries.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Constipation
Fluid Retention
Digestive Disorders
Premature Aging

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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