The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Pears

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Pears seem to be the fruit that always appears in still life paintings, yet is often absent from the family fruit bowl. A good pear is soft and juicy and packed with fibre. I say therefore, persevere with pears. Pears are better if picked before they are completely ripe. The most common variety of pears are the Beurre Bosc, William and Packham. (see individual listings). The majority of pears sold today are unripe. Ripe pears often look unappealing as they can bear a few marks. Pears ripen from the inside out. In Australia there's a pear available all year round.

Note: The pear's levels of salicylates drop to safe/negligible amounts if the fruit is peeled.
Category: Fruit
In Season: all year
To Buy: As if you were buying fresh flowers, buy them in anticipation of a need. The most ripe for quick use and unripe to eat in few days time. There is a small window between a ripe pear and one that is overripe. Look for pears free of blemishes and cuts. Choose those that are fragrant without any soft spots.
To Store: Store unripe pears in a paper bag at room temperature until they give to slight pressure. It is best to turn pears occasionally while ripening. Refrigerate ripened pears and use within three or four days. Avoid stacking pears on top of each other.
Tips & Tricks: To check for ripeness gently squeeze at the stalk end to feel for some give.

Nutrition (1 Unit):

Energy (kJ): 405
Low GI < 55: Glycaemic Index refers to the rate at which carbohydrate rich foods are converted to glucose for energy by the body; Low GI carbohydrtes release glucose is released slowly into the bloodstream and help to regulate energy levels and insulin production.
Protein (g): 0.5
Saturated Fat, g : 0.0
Vitamin C: Antioxidant, anti inflammatory and immune-boosting, this vitamin has a range of uses. Is essential for collagen formation, therefore plays a role in wound healing. Fights infection and protects against free radical damage. Vitamin C helps maintain normal cholesterol levels, promotes the absorption of iron and counters the effects of stress as it is concentrated in the adrenal glands.

Contraindications:
Large doses can cause diaorrhea or gas.
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Moderate
Carbohydrates, g: 22.4
Fibre, g:
Fat (g): 0.2
Monosaturated Fat , g: 0.0
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. No information available
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Eat raw with the skin on. Serve in salads with a contrasting-flavoured cheese on top. Poached pears served with pancakes is a delicious start to the day.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Cold and Flus
Diabetes
High Blood Cholesterol
Constipation
Diarrhoea

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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